Accommodating People

Edinburgh Suburbs

Abbeyhill is one of the oldest areas of Edinburgh and just ten minutes walk from the city centre. It is especially a great base to explore the Old Town as a ten minute walk will bring you to landmarks such as Calton Hill and the Palace of Holyrood House – the Queen’s residence when she is in town. The ruins of Holyrood Abbey from which Abbeyhill derives its name, can be accessed within the grounds of the palace.
Across the road from the palace is the iconic Scottish Parliament building which opened in 2004 and offers free guided tours six days a week. Visitors can attend parliament debates free of charge.
Nature lovers can start the day with a walk round Holyrood Park or climb up Arthur’s Seat and Salisbury Crags to take in panoramic views of the whole of the city. If you prefer to keep fit indoors then Meadowbank Sports Centre, host to two Commonwealth Games, has a wealth of facilities. And for those who like to shop, Meadowbank Retail Park is right in the heart of Abbeyhill, and the city centre just a short bus ride away.

Accommodation in Abbeyhill – Abbeyhill has a mix of Victorian and contemporary property. This cosy one bedroom tenement flat has a leafy outlook onto the historical Abbeyhill colonies (rows of housing built between 1850 and 1910 as homes for artisans and skilled working-class families). For something a little more modern this two bedroom flat with balcony in a 1960s block may be ideal. But for the ultimate in style, this spacious modern three bedroom penthouse with breathtaking views across the city is perfect.

Broughton – A stone’s throw from Edinburgh Waverley train station and Edinburgh bus station, Broughton is one of Edinburgh’s oldest yet most central and vibrant areas.
On Broughton Street traditional pubs sit alongside gift shops, contemporary bars and fine-dining restaurants. A short walk towards the top of Leith Walk gives diners an equally wide choice of international flavours.
In Broughton you will also find the Playhouse Theatre, where many West End productions stop off for a run. The OMNi centre at the top of Leith Walk houses a cinema and gym as well as several chain pubs and restaurants. The area is also home to many of Edinburgh’s gay pubs and nightclubs.
If you fancy a spot of shopping then Princes Street is just a five minute walk away from Broughton. But if nature is more your thing then take a ten minute stroll down to Canonmills and explore the Water of Leith walkway which runs from Leith to Balerno.
Edinburgh’s tram network runs from York Place in Broughton down Princes Street, through the West End and on to Edinburgh Airport.

Accommodation in Broughton is eclectic and spans several centuries with some of the tenement flats predating the building of the New Town. For a taste of the traditional this beautifully refurbished two bedroom apartment maintains many period features without compromising on modern conveniences.

Bruntsfield is a well-heeled suburb twenty minutes walk or a short bus ride from Edinburgh city centre. It is well-known for being home to James Gillespie’s High School, the inspiration for Muriel Spark’s The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, but this attractive area has much else to recommend it.
Golf fans can visit Bruntsfield Links short hole course and play a round for free. A short walk from the Links will bring you to the famous Cameo cinema, which shows a variety of independent films and The King’s Theatre, a popular venue for contemporary and historical theatre.
Sports enthusiasts will also enjoy the Warrender Swim Centre – a traditional Victorian baths in Bruntsfield. The centre has a modern pool, gym and sauna but also maintains many of its original and charming 19th century features.
The Meadows, a large public park, straddles Bruntsfield and neighbouring Marchmont and is a popular spot in summer for barbeques and picnics as well as a resting spot for tired festival-goers. The Meadows is also home to a children’s play park, municipal tennis courts, croquet, picnic tables and designated barbeque areas.
A stroll through the grounds of nearby Edinburgh University, will take you to the Old Town and famous attractions such as Edinburgh Castle, Greyfriars Bobby and the National Museum of Scotland. Bruntsfield is a perfect location if you are visiting the Edinburgh Festival and Fringe in August as many of the university’s historical buildings double as performance venues.
But if you’d rather spend some time close to home, Bruntsfield Place is a perfect place to while away the hours amongst the eclectic range of boutiques, coffee shops and restaurants.

Accommodation in Bruntsfield is predominantly Victorian. For a traditional tenement property with unobstructed views of The Meadows and Edinburgh Castle, this four bedroom flat is ideal. Alternatively, this recently decorated bright two bedroom apartment may be just what you are looking for. Larger groups may like this spacious three bedroom apartment which sleeps up to nine.

Calton Hill forms part of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site as well as its iconic skyline. Climb to the top in minutes and soak in views of the whole of Edinburgh including Edinburgh Castle, Holyrood Park, Holyrood Palace, the Scottish Parliament, Arthur’s Seat, Salisbury Crags and Princes Street.
Besides stunning views of Edinburgh, you also will find some striking monuments atop Calton Hill. Marvel at the National Monument, an Athenian acropolis type structure, which is actually an unfinished replica of the Parthenon in Athens and a memorial to those who died in the Napoleonic wars. See, also the Nelson Monument, Dugald Stewart Monument, Political Martyrs Monument and nearby the old Royal High School and Robert Burns Monument. And don’t forget to visit the Old Observatory House and the City Observatory both atop the hill.
During the Edinburgh Festival and Hogmanay, Calton Hill is a fantastic place to view celebratory fireworks displays. The Beltane Fire Festival a revived Celtic tradition, lights up Edinburgh’s skyline when it comes to Calton Hill on the last day of April each year.

Accommodation in Calton Hill – For traditional accommodation with a contemporary feel this converted brewery townhouse is ideal. The communal garden has views onto Calton Hill and Arthur’s Seat.

Alternatively, this Victorian tenement is tastefully renovated with some period features and just five minutes walk from the lively East End. This Grade A listed terraced Georgian house was designed by William Playfair, one of the great Scottish architects of the 19th century. Guests have access to an attractive terraced garden at the rear of the property.

Comely Bank – Dating back to 1817 when it was just a row of terraced houses, Comely Bank is a quiet residential suburb just a fifteen minute walk from the city’s West End. It borders onto Stockbridge with its unique range of specialty shops, cafes and charity shops known for their high quality merchandise.
From Comely Bank you can visit Inverleith Park – perfect for sports, picnic and dog walking. From the park you can marvel at the stunning architecture of Fettes College – rumoured to be the inspiration for Hogwarts School in the Harry Potter series – drop into the Royal Botanic Gardens or walk to the stunning World Heritage Site of Dean Village, both of which are within ten minutes walk.

Accommodation in Comely Bank

For modern living with a traditional twist why not try this newly modernised two bedroom flat in a private, Art Deco development with stunning views down to Fettes College. Alternatively, this three bedroom apartment is in a well maintained Victorian tenement block, in the heart of Comely Bank. And this two bedroom tenement flat is recently renovated and offers the option of renting the whole property or just one double room.

Dalry is a popular residential area just ten minutes walk from Edinburgh city centre, the West End and Haymarket rail station.
There is no shortage of things to do in Dalry. Caledonian Crescent is home to one of Edinburgh’s Victorian swimming baths – the Dalry Swim Centre – and the nearby Fountain Park entertainment centre includes a cinema, kids soft play, several restaurants and ten-pin bowling alley.
From Dalry you can also take a walk or cycle along the Union Canal which runs from Edinburgh to Falkirk.
Dalry is bordered by Tollcross and the West End where you will find a large selection of shops, cafes and restaurants as well as transport links to Edinburgh Zoo and Murrayfield Stadium, home of Scottish rugby.

Accommodation in Dalry

Accommodation in Dalry is unique as many of our apartments are in converted distillery buildings. One example is this two bedroom ground floor apartment in The Dalry Gait development which provides excellent modern accommodation with private off street parking. And within the stylish Caledonian Village development can be found this beautifully appointed and spacious three bedroom apartment. Equally historic, and within walking distance of Haymarket rail station, this bright four bedroom flat is located in the historic Dalry colonies (rows of housing built between 1850 and 1910 as homes for artisans and skilled working-class families).

Dean Village is part of Edinburgh’s World Heritage Site and just five minutes walk from Princes Street and the centre of Edinburgh.
This leafy, historic enclave was once a separate village from Edinburgh and a thriving milling hub. Now, many of the old mill buildings, warehouses and workers’ homes have been converted into modern day property.
If you take a walk or cycle along The Water of Leith, which runs through Dean Village en-route from Leith to Balerno, you will come to the Dean Bridge, designed by Thomas Telford and opened in 1833. You can also see St. Bernard’s Well, inspired by an Italian temple and site of healing waters. And if you crave more stunning architecture then a must-visit is The Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, which also encompasses former orphanage – The Dean Gallery.

Accommodation in Dean Village

Dean Village offers a blend of traditional and modern accommodation but all properties are quiet and tranquil. You may like this modern one bedroom apartment situated right in the heart of the village. Or for views onto the Water of Leith this three bedroom town house is perfect.

Fountainbridge – Just a five to ten minute walk from Fountainbridge takes you into the West End of Edinburgh, or in the other direction to attractions such as Edinburgh Castle and the Grassmarket.
Things to do in Fountainbridge itself include The Fountain Park entertainment centre which houses a cinema, kids soft play, several restaurants and ten-pin bowling alley. You can also take a walk or cycle along the Union Canal which runs from Edinburgh to Falkirk. A small street food market is held at the start of the canal on Fridays.
Nearby Bruntsfield has an eclectic range of shops, cafes and restaurants and you will also find Bruntsfield Links short hole course where you can play a round of golf for free.
Fountainbridge is close to Tollcross and the West End where you will find a large selection of shops, cafes and restaurants as well as transport links to Edinburgh Zoo and Murrayfield Stadium, home of Scottish rugby.

Accommodation in Fountainbridge

Fountainbridge offers a blend of traditional and modern accommodation. Central, but in an historic building with courtyard, is this lovely refurbished second floor, one bedroom apartment. For something more contemporary, this beautiful second floor apartment is in a modern building and is stylishly decorated throughout with stunning views along the Union canal.

Grassmarket – When it comes to historical Edinburgh you can’t get much more central than Grassmarket, part of the city’s World Heritage Site. Located in a hollow in the Old Town and watched over by Edinburgh Castle, Grassmarket is an ancient marketplace dating back to 1477. It was also once a site for public hangings. Nowadays, it is a venue for current cultural offerings.
Historic pubs surround the market area in Grassmarket, many of which are family friendly and offer dining and outside seating areas. There are also a variety of restaurants and many independent and artisan retailers. In fact, 90% of the retail outlets in Grassmarket are independently owned.
There is a weekly Saturday market in Grassmarket which sells fresh, local produce including organic vegetables, artisan breads, fish and meat as well as crafts and gifts. Come December, a Christmas market is held from Friday to Sunday.
During the Edinburgh International Festival and Festival Fringe, Grassmarket is a venue for many free acts and you will find a buzzing and vibrant atmosphere unparalleled in the city.
Within short walking distance are Edinburgh Castle, The Royal Mile, Greyfriars Bobby, The National Museum of Scotland, Holyrood Palace and countless other bars and restaurants, including The Elephant House where J.K Rowling wrote Harry Potter.

Accommodation in Grassmarket

The accommodation in Grassmarket is a blend of traditional and contemporary. You can be right in the heart of the action but sleep soundly in this triple glazed one bedroom apartment with shared garden.

Haymarket –A mere five minutes from the West End and centre of Edinburgh, Haymarket is a perfect central point for exploring the city as well as a gateway to the rest of Scotland. Trains to local and national rail hubs depart from the newly upgraded Haymarket rail station and there are superb transport links into the city as well as access to Edinburgh’s cycle paths.
From Haymarket you can walk within twenty minutes to the Royal Mile, Grassmarket and Edinburgh Castle and also take a walk or cycle along the Union Canal which runs from Edinburgh to Falkirk. A short stroll in the direction of Bruntsfield will take you to The King’s Theatre which stages many contemporary and historical plays, and the famous Cameo cinema. And if you’re looking to entertain the kids then the Fountain Park entertainment centre at nearby Fountainbridge includes a cinema, soft play, several restaurants and ten pin bowling alley.
Edinburgh’s recently re-established tram network runs from Haymarket to York Place in Broughton where there are more shops, restaurants, bars and theatres to explore.

Accommodation in Haymarket

Accommodation in Haymarket offers a mix of traditional Victorian and contemporary. Larger groups or families may be interested in this six bedroom Victorian property in the heart of Haymarket. For nearby transport links this luxury, bright, second floor, one bedroom flat is ideal. And if you prefer a modern building this two bedroom, newly refurbished first floor apartment is perfect.

Holyrood forms part of central Edinburgh and the Old Town. It is within easy access to bus and Edinburgh Waverley train station which links Edinburgh to the rest of Scotland and the U.K.
At the foot of the Royal Mile lies The Palace of Holyrood House. Dating back to 1503 and once a residence of Mary Queen of Scots, Holyrood Palace is the Queen’s residence at the end of June each year. Prince Charles also resides here one week of the year. The palace is open to visitors outside of these times.
Also worth a visit and just across the road is the iconic Scottish Parliament building which opened in 2004 and offers free guided tours six days a week. Visitors can attend parliament debates free of charge.
Lovers of the outdoors can take a walk or cycle around Holyrood Park, climb Arthur’s Seat or Salisbury Crags and take in the stunning views over the whole city of Edinburgh.

Accommodation in Holyrood

On a quiet edge of Holyrood Park this three bedroom apartment commands breath taking views over Arthur’s Seat. For something a little cosier but with an equally stunning outlook, this one bedroom property is ideal. For a more modern advantage this one bedroom property close to the Meadowbank side of the park offers free off-street parking.

Inverleith – A well-heeled suburb on the northern fringes of the city, Inverleith is home to some of the most desirable property in Edinburgh.
Located in Inverleith is the Royal Botanic Garden, a scientific centre for the study of plants and a popular tourist attraction for walks, live performances, guided tours and exhibitions.
Across from “The Botanics” is Inverleith Park an expansive green area suitable for dog walking, sports and picnics. There is also a pond where you can spot water birds. Inverleith Park offers fantastic views of the Edinburgh skyline, including the castle and is a popular vantage point for the Hogmanay fireworks. Just adjacent to the park is the majestic Fettes College, one of Scotland’s most prestigious private schools and, reputedly, the inspiration for J.K Rowling’s Hogwarts Academy.
A twenty minute walk from Inverleith will take you to the centre of Edinburgh. Walk a similar distance in the other direction and you will come to the picturesque Newhaven Harbour where you can stop on a sunny day for fish and chips overlooking the Firth of Forth.
Buses travel regularly between Inverleith and the city centre. The journey takes around ten minutes.

Accommodation in Inverleith

For something compact but stunning, this Georgian studio apartment sleeps two and is also a stone’s throw from The Botanics. Also boasting stunning Georgian architecture is this two bedroom ground floor apartment which is serviced daily.

Leith – Dating back to the 12th century and more recently immortalised in The Proclaimers song, Sunshine on Leith, Leith is a vibrant suburb, which at one time was a separate municipal burgh from the rest of Edinburgh. The mile long Leith Walk links Leith to the city centre and hosts an eclectic and multicultural range of retailers and eating and drinking establishments. Leith, itself, is home to the Royal Yacht Britannia, which is berthed alongside Ocean Terminal shopping centre.
For eating and drinking, The Shore is an attractive area of Leith where cosmopolitan pubs and restaurants sit around the old port. It is also host to a farmers’ market on the weekends. After lunch, take a stroll on Leith Links – a former golf course where the first official rules of the game were formulated. Now a public park, The Links is home to children’s play areas, football pitches, bowling greens and tennis and petanque courts.
Leith Victoria Swim Centre is a traditional Victorian baths near the foot of Leith Walk. The centre has a modern pool, gym, fitness studio, steam room and sauna but also maintains many of its original and charming 19th century features.
Art lovers will not be disappointed at Leith’s selection of galleries, and nature aficionados will enjoy taking a walk along the Water of Leith walkway which links Leith to the rest of the city.

Frequent buses run between Leith and the city centre. The journey takes around ten minutes.

Accommodation in Leith

Leith has an eclectic mix of accommodation with something to cater for everyone’s tastes. This one bedroom rooftop apartment is located in an old whisky bond building and commands views across Leith Links and the Firth of Forth. For a stunning one bedroom loft style apartment with the added benefit of underfloor heating, this bright property is just five minutes’ walk from the buzz of The Shore. And if that isn’t close enough then this traditional Victorian tenement sleeps four and is right on The Shore.

Marchmont is a desirable residential area twenty minutes walk, or a short bus ride, from Edinburgh city centre.
Marchmont is bordered by Brunstfield and nearby Morningside. Golf fans can visit Bruntsfield Links short hole course and play a round for free. A short walk from the Links will bring you to the famous Cameo cinema, which shows a variety of independent films and The King’s Theatre, a popular venue for contemporary and historical theatre.
Sports enthusiasts will also enjoy the Warrender Swim Centre – a traditional Victorian baths in neighbouring Bruntsfield. The centre has a modern pool, gym and sauna but also maintains many of its original and charming 19th century features.
The Meadows, a large public park, straddles Bruntsfield and Marchmont and is a popular spot in summer for barbeques and picnics as well as being a resting spot for tired festival-goers. It is also home to a children’s play park, municipal tennis courts, croquet, picnic tables and designated barbeque areas.
A stroll across The Meadows and through the grounds of nearby Edinburgh University, will take you to the Old Town and famous attractions such as Edinburgh Castle, Greyfriars Bobby and the National Museum of Scotland.
But if you’d rather spend some time close to home, Marchmont and its neighbour Bruntsfield, are perfect for whiling away the hours amongst the eclectic range of boutiques, coffee shops and restaurants.

Accommodation in Marchmont

Accommodation in Marchmont is predominantly Victorian. For something slightly larger, this four bedroom flat sleeps up to 12 people.

The Meadows – Running from Bruntsfield to Marchmont, The Meadows is an expansive open park with many tree-lined paths upon which one can cycle or walk. It is also home to a children’s play park, municipal tennis courts, croquet, picnic tables and designated barbeque areas. Golfers can play a round for free on adjoining Bruntsfield Links short hole course.
In warmer weather The Meadows is perfect for a picnic, and its proximity to many Festival and Festival Fringe venues make it a popular resting spot for locals and visitors alike come August.
Sports enthusiasts will enjoy the Warrender Swim Centre, a traditional Victorian baths in neighbouring Bruntsfield. The centre has a modern pool, gym and sauna but also maintains many of its original and charming 19th century features.
A stroll across The Meadows and through the grounds of nearby Edinburgh University, will take you to the Old Town and famous attractions such as Edinburgh Castle, Greyfriars Bobby and the National Museum of Scotland.
But if you’d rather spend some time close to home, Marchmont and Bruntsfield, both of which border onto The Meadows, are perfect for whiling away the hours amongst the eclectic range of boutiques, coffee shops and restaurants.

Accommodation in The Meadows

For a traditional tenement with mod cons and views of The Meadows and Edinburgh Castle, try this spacious three bedroom property. Nearby Quartermile offers stunning contemporary accommodation in this striking one bedroom apartment.

Merchiston – One of Edinburgh’s most desirable suburbs, this quiet residential area is the home of author Ian Rankin and former home of J.K Rowling, Merchiston is bordered by Morningside and Bruntsfield both of which have an eclectic range of boutiques, cafes and restaurants. To the north of Merchiston is the Union Canal which runs from Edinburgh to Falkirk and along which you can take a walk or cycle. You can also walk down to Bruntsfield Links and play a round for free on the short hole golf course. Or, if the weather is clement, take a picnic and relax on The Meadows.
Buses run frequently from Merchiston into the city centre. The journey takes around twenty minutes.

Accommodation in Merchiston

A smaller apartment of high standard is this one bedroom top floor tenement flat with extensive views across the Pentland Hills. For larger groups, this three bedroom garden apartment can accommodate up to 16 guests.

Morningside – One of Edinburgh’s most desirable suburbs, Morningside lies to the south-west of the city and is bordered by Bruntsfield and Merchiston. The main thoroughfare has many speciality shops, cafes and restaurants as well as some chain supermarkets.
Morningside offers plenty to entertain. It is home to the famous Dominion Cinema, a family run four-screen cinema with an opulent art deco interior. The Church Hill Theatre, in Morningside is a popular Festival Fringe and amateur dramatics venue. And then there is the Wild West Street, a hidden gem, which was built in the 1990s to create a Wild West ambience for a furniture business but still stands today.
Visitors to Morningside can still see The Morningside Clock, a famous timepiece which once stood in the middle of the road as the clock for rail passengers at the now closed Morningside Railway Station. Also of historic interest is Holy Corner, where there is a church on each corner of the intersection.
If you are feeling thirsty after visiting all of Morningside’s attractions then drop into the famous Canny Man’s pub, a unique establishment where no mobile phones or cameras are allowed.
The Braid Hills Golf Course is a short drive from Morningside and offers unparalleled views across the whole of Edinburgh.
Buses run frequently from Morningside into the city centre. The journey takes around 15 minutes.

Accommodation in Morningside

This attractively decorated two bedroom Victorian tenement flat benefits from a private garden and sleeps up to nine. Larger parties can bed down in luxury in this comfortable six bedroom flat with spacious queen size rooms. For something smaller yet just as stunning, this two bedroom bright and sunny main door flat is right in the heart of Morningside.

New Town – Don’t let the name fool you, Edinburgh’s New Town dates back to the 1700s. Set in an ordered grid, sandstone buildings, some with Grecian pillars, line cobbled streets in this central World Heritage Site. The Georgian and neo-classical buildings of the New Town are some of the most stunning architecture the city has to offer.
Museums abound in this part of Edinburgh. Visit the Scottish National Gallery and The Royal Scottish Academy on The Mound or head down to Queen Street to see the Scottish National Portrait Gallery. For a step into the New Town’s past, visit the Georgian House in Charlotte Square to see how the upper classes lived in the 18th century.
If you’ve a good head for heights then climbing the Scott Monument on Princes Street is a must. It is the largest monument to a writer in the world and the view from the top is nothing short of spectacular.
Those who prefer to keep their feet on the ground can visit the historic and ornate Jenners department store then shop on the rest of Princes Street whilst taking in views of Edinburgh Castle. For more shopping head up to George Street where designer and top end fashion stores sit alongside a selection of quality dining establishments.
If you need a break from sightseeing and shopping then Princes Street Gardens is the perfect place for a rest or a picnic on a sunny day. Winter sees the gardens play host to the Christmas markets.
During the Edinburgh Festival you will find George Street in the New Town transformed into a bustling thoroughfare of entertainment venues and outdoor eateries. The grand Assembly Rooms serves as a venue for many world renowned acts and The Famous Spiegeltent also takes up pitch in George Street for the month of August.
The central location of the New Town means a short walk will take you to many other areas of the city such as Stockbridge, Dean Village, Canonmills, Leith Walk, and the Old Town.

Accommodation in the New Town

Traditional and stunning, this beautifully furnished two bedroom flat has a private garden. If you’d rather be in the very centre of town, attention has been given to every detail in this stunningly decorated and furnished two bedroom apartment. And for the perfect blend of central location with peace and quiet, this one bedroom property is perfect.

Newington – A fifteen minute walk south of the city centre and Royal Mile, formerly rural Newington was separate from Edinburgh until the building of the South Bridge in 1788. Nowadays, its proximity to Edinburgh University makes this suburb vibrant and popular with students.
During the Edinburgh Festival many of the University buildings double up as venues, thus making Newington an ideal spot for festival-goers. The venues around the Royal Mile and Old Town are also minutes away. For the eleven months of the year that the Festival is not in town head to the Festival Theatre to catch a musical, a play or a dance show.
If nature if more your thing, then The Meadows – home to a children’s play park, municipal tennis courts, croquet, picnic tables and designated barbeque area – is right on the doorstep of Newington. Holyrood Park is a stone’s throw away where you can climb Arthur’s Seat or Salisbury Crags and enjoy unparalleled views across the city.
Newington is also home to the Royal Commonwealth Pool, commissioned in 1966 to bring the Commonwealth Games to Edinburgh. The “Commie” is home to a 50m swimming pool as well as diving and teaching pools.
Part of the old Edinburgh to Dalkeith railway line has been converted to a cycle path and can be entered at Newington. It is fondly known as the Innocent Railway due to its having being horse drawn in an age of steam trains.

Accommodation in Newington

Larger groups may find exactly what they are looking for with this exceptionally spacious, five bedroom tenement flat which can sleep up to fourteen people.

The Old Town is the very centre and the oldest part of Edinburgh, and there is no shortage of things to see and do here.
From the very top of the Royal Mile, take in the stunning views of the city from Edinburgh Castle. Then stroll down and visit The Scotch Whisky Experience where you can learn all about Scotland’s national drink and maybe even buy a few bottles. Visit Gladstone’s Land- a traditional tenement building and discover the Writer’s Museum. Stop off for an underground tour at Mary King’s Close, part of the original Old Town which was built upon after the Great Plague. Or if you are feeling really brave, do one of the many ghost tours available. On the Royal Mile you will also find the grandeur of St. Giles Cathedral, The Scottish Storytelling Centre and John Knox House – the only original medieval building surviving on the Royal Mile. If you are feeling nostalgic you can relive your past at the Museum of Childhood.
There are plenty of eating and drinking options on the Royal Mile. Keep a keen eye out for all the little side streets, known as “closes”, many of which are home to hidden bars and restaurants.
At the foot of the Royal Mile sits the iconic Scottish Parliament building which opened in 2004 and offers free guided tours six days a week. Visitors can attend parliament debates free of charge.
Just beyond the parliament lies The Palace of Holyrood House. Dating back to 1503 and once a residence of Mary Queen of Scots, the palace is the Queen’s residence at the end of June each year. Prince Charles also resides here one week of the year. Outside of these times the palace is open to visitors.
Beyond the palace is Holyrood Park, an expansive public park from which you can climb Arthur’s Seat or Salisbury Crags and enjoy unparalleled views across the city.
From the Royal Mile you can also walk down to the Grassmarket – an historic marketplace with an equal amount of history and current culture to absorb you for hours.
Also within short walking distance of the Royal Mile is Greyfriars Bobby, The National Museum of Scotland and countless other bars and restaurants including The Elephant House, where J.K Rowling wrote Harry Potter.

Accommodation in the Old Town

This four bedroom traditional flat is right in the heart of the Old Town, has fantastic views of Edinburgh Castle and can sleep up to twelve people. However, if you prefer ground level living then try this three bedroom townhouse in a private courtyard just moments from the Royal Mile. For unsurpassed luxury, and directly above the birthplace of Harry Potter, these stunning apartments offer unrivalled views of various Old Town attractions. Couples may like this fresh and bright one bedroom apartment, located in one of Edinburgh’s most famous and oldest closes and dating back to 1544. The property is furnished to an extremely high standard yet offers traditional features and a unique outdoor terrace. And for something bang up to date this two bedroom apartment is part of an award-winning development yet located down a traditional cobbled close in the very heart of the Old Town.

Polwarth is a quiet residential area with close proximity to Bruntsfield and its eclectic range of shops cafes and restaurants. It is also bordered with Merchiston, Gorgie and Dalry. Harrison Park in Polwarth is a Green Flag award winning park, seven hectares in size with a range of recreational facilities as well as bedding displays and roses.
From Polwarth you can also take a walk or cycle along the Union Canal towpath which runs from Edinburgh to Falkirk. The canal itself is home to abundant wildlife such as moorhen, mallard, coot, mute swan and pipistrell bats.
Frequent buses run between Polwarth and Edinburgh city centre. The journey takes around fifteen minutes.

Accommodation in Polwarth

Accommodation in Polwarth is predominantly Victorian with some contemporary properties. This modern three bedroom house can sleep up to five people and has a private garden. For something more traditional, this three bedroom flat sleeps up to six and has retained many of its period features. This one bedroom flat also has a wealth of original period features and charm.

Portobello – Just three miles east of the city centre is Edinburgh’s seaside suburb, Portobello, with two miles of golden sand and walk along promenade. Summer days see visitors and locals flock here to swim, play and relax.
If the weather is less than clement then the Victorian elegance of Portobello Swim Centre beckons. The centre is home to one of only three functioning Turkish baths in Scotland. Further down the promenade is Tumbles, Edinburgh’s first and only purpose-built gymnastics facility and Softplay venue. Visitors can also keep fit by cycling or walking along the promenade and Craigentinny Golf Course is a short drive away.
To satisfy the hungry appetite, Portobello High Street offers an assortment of cafes and restaurants. During Spring and Summer, Portobello Markets is held in Brighton Park selling local and organic fruit, veg, meat, fish and baking, as well as a selection of crafts and other organic products.

Accommodation in Portobello

This one bedroom family home with period features and wooden furnishings is perfect for a family or group of friends looking to strike a balance between festival fun and seaside tranquility. If you are looking for bright and airy with many original period features then this traditional two bedroom flat is ideal. And just along the road from Portobello, in leafy Joppa, this 4 star Bed and Breakfast offers traditional Scottish hospitality moments from the beach.

Stockbridge – One of Edinburgh’s most desirable suburbs, bordered by the New Town and Comely Bank, Stockbridge has plenty to offer the visitor.
Soak up the village vibe as you wander amongst the bountiful array of speciality shops, independent cafes and restaurants which Stockbridge has to offer. The area is also well known for its charity shops, some of which are the highest grossing in the U.K. And every Sunday a farmer’s market is held in Jubilee Gardens.
For those with an interest in architecture, Stockbridge is home to historical churches such as St. Stephen’s and St. Cuthberts as well as the much-coveted Stockbridge Colonies built for the Artisan class between 1861 and 1911.
Nature lovers can take a stroll to Stockbridge’s Inverleith Park, visit the Royal Botanic Gardens or wander along the Water of Leith walkway which runs from Leith to Balerno.
Glenogle Swim Centre is a traditional Victorian baths between Stockbridge and neighbouring Canonmills. The centre has a pool, gym, fitness studio, steam room and sauna but also maintains many of its original and charming features.
A short ten-minute walk from Stockbridge will take you to the picturesque World Heritage Site of Dean Village, an historical milling hub, now a much sought after residential enclave.
Frequent buses run between Stockbridge and the city centre. The West End is a ten minute walk away.

Accommodation in Stockbridge

If you are looking for a peaceful haven with all Stockbridge’s trappings on the doorstep then this chic one bedroom garden apartment could be perfect. Or for the ultimate in luxury book into this opulent two bedroom Georgian property. Large groups may be interested in this four bedroom double upper villa which sleeps eleven.

Tollcross is a lively area, just a short walk from Edinburgh city centre. It is home to a selection of contemporary bars as well as traditional pubs and a couple of nightclubs. Caffeine lovers won’t be short of coffee shops and, there is a variety of affordable cuisine from different corners of the globe.
Tollcross is home to two independent cinemas: The Cameo and The Filmhouse, both of which have bars. And for theatre-goers there is always a show on at The King’s Theatre.
For a more independent vibe and slightly less bustle, walk up to neighbouring Bruntsfield and indulge in the array of independent eateries and retailers there. Or take a walk on The Meadows or Bruntsfield Links, public parks which border onto Tollcross. The Meadows is home to a children’s play park, municipal tennis courts, croquet, picnic tables and designated barbeque areas. Golfers can play a round for free on Bruntsfield Links short hole course.
Tollcross is fifteen minutes walk from the Old Town and all its historical trappings such as Edinburgh Castle, the Grassmarket and Greyfriars Bobby as well as hundreds of Fringe venues during the Edinburgh Festival season.
Haymarket rail station is a seven minute walk from Tollcross and the area is served by numerous buses which connect it to the rest of Edinburgh.

Accommodation in Tollcross

This lovely, bright one bedroom flat has a fantastic central location yet the quiet courtyard setting offers peace when required.   Similarly, this two bedroom apartment in a modern block is located in a quiet residential street yet moments away from shops and cafes. For something completely unique why not try this two bedroom modern houseboat, permanently docked on the Union Canal.

Trinity – A hidden gem in Edinburgh’s north, Trinity is a well-heeled suburb a short bus ride from the city centre.
Many of the buildings in Trinity were once “country retreats” for those who lived in the New Town. Residents of this quiet area enjoy access to Victoria Park with its free tennis and basketball courts, children’s play area and ample green space for relaxing, and Starbank Park with its quant rose garden.
Trinity is bordered by the historic fishing village of Newhaven. Wander along the cobbled streets to the harbour with its pretty fishing boats – a drawcard for photo opportunities. Around the breakwater also provides a pleasant and picturesque place to take a walk.
In both Trinity and Newhaven there are several pubs and restaurants serving delicious seafood dishes, some with views overlooking the water. You can also take a five minute taxi ride to Leith’s Shore area where more dining options await.
A fifteen minute walk from Trinity will take you to Ocean Terminal shopping centre, alongside which the Royal Yacht Britannia is berthed.
There is easy access from Trinity to Edinburgh’s cycle path network (once railways lines). This route is also suitable for pedestrians and dog walkers.
Frequent buses run between Trinity and Edinburgh city centre. The journey takes around twenty minutes.

Accommodation in Trinity

Accommodation in Trinity offers a mix of traditional Victorian tenements, mansions, cottages and contemporary flats. This lovely two bedroom cottage with wood burning stove is perfect for families or those who wish a quiet property with a garden and parking. Located in a modern block this two bedroom bright and spacious apartment is just across the road from Victoria Park. For a simple property with sea views this one bedroom maisonette with balcony is just perfect.

West End – A few moments away from Princes Street and it can feel like you are in another world altogether as you step into Edinburgh’s West End. Wander along cobbled streets and absorb the beautiful Georgian architecture of this World Heritage Site. Stroll onto William Street and Stafford Street where you will find many independent retailers – fashion and dining alike.
If you walk up to the south of the West End you can marvel at the red sandstone of the former Caledonian Railway Hotel on the corner of Lothian Road and Princes Street. Further up Lothian Road you will reach cultural venues such as the Usher Hall, The Filmhouse, the Royal Lyceum and the Traverse Theatre.
Buses connect the West End to the rest of Edinburgh and beyond. Murrayfield Stadium, home of Scottish rugby, is a ten minute bus ride away from the West End as is Edinburgh Zoo.
Haymarket rail station is a short walk from the West End where you will find train links to the rest of Scotland and the U.K. This area is also served by Edinburgh’s tram network, which runs from York Place in the East, down Princes Street, through the West End and on to Edinburgh Airport.

Accommodation in the West End

This three bedroom Georgian apartment is the ultimate in Scottish luxury and perfect for exploring the West End or a peaceful dinner at home and a cosy night by the wood burning stove. For something a little smaller, this lovely studio mews apartment could be just what you are looking for. Larger groups may find this magnificent four bedroom property suited to their needs.

 

Next Post

Previous Post

© 2017 edlets.com

//